Argentina

Hydrological impacts of solar radiation management in the La Plata Basin in South America

Project summary

Fresh water availability is one of the key climate challenges in the La Plata Basin in south-eastern South America. The river basin is home to more than 160 million people and is the fourth largest in the world. A large fraction of the economic activities within the basin rely on water availability, including agriculture, river navigability and hydroelectric production. Therefore, any variation in the water cycle of the basin could have significant impacts on the local economies. During the last few decades, this region has been subject to positive trends in many variables relevant for socio-economic activities like precipitation, river flows and floods, as well as extreme temperatures. Dr Camilloni and team are currently researching the possible effects of SRM in the hydroclimate of the La Plata basin. The project is hosted at the University of Buenos Aires & CONICET (CIMA).

Río de La Plata estuary. Photo credit: Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, NASA Johnson Space Center (https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov).

The team

Dr Ines Angela CamilloniDr Ines Angela Camilloni (Argentine) – Principal Investigator
University of Buenos Aires & CONICET

Ines Camilloni is a Full Professor at the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the School of Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and an Independent Researcher of the Argentina National Research Council (CONICET), Argentina. She is currently the Director of the Master in Environmental Sciences (UBA). She has a PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Buenos Aires. Her research focuses on climate variability and change in South America, acting on the following subjects: climate scenarios, climate change impacts, cities and climate change. She has authored several peer-reviewed scientific journal articles, book chapters and books. She has participated in or coordinated many research projects related to these subjects. She has been Lead Author of the IPCC AR5-WG1 and SR15 reports and currently is Review Editor of the IPCC AR6-WG1.
Dr Carla GuliziaDr Carla Gulizia (Argentine)
University of Buenos Aires & CONICET

Dr Carla Gulizia holds a permanent position as Assistant Researcher at the Argentinean National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET), working at the Research Center of the Sea and the Atmosphere (CIMA/CONICET-UBA). She is also a Professor’s Assistant at the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Faculty of Science, at the University of Buenos Aires (DCAO/FCEN-UBA). Carla has Licentiate (2004-2009) and PhD (2009-2014) degrees in Atmospheric Sciences, both from the University of Buenos Aires (UBA), and conducted her postdoctoral research (2014-2017) at CIMA/CONICET-UBA in Argentina. Her latest research focused on the study of the hydroclimatology of south-eastern South America and its response to different local and regional climatic forces in the context of climate change. She has extensive experience in managing and analysing large datasets (e.g. Global Climate Models simulations) as well as in developing rainfall-runoff statistical models, with the main objective of advancing the assessment of the vulnerability of water resources in the region.
Dr Natalia MontroullDr Natalia Montroull (Argentine)
University of Buenos Aires & CONICET

Natalia Montroull is a Research Scientist at the Center for Sea and Atmospheric Research (CIMA / CONICET-UBA-UMI-IFAECI) and a Teaching Assistant in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires. She has a PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Buenos Aires. Her research topic focuses on the assessment of climate change impacts on water resources. More specifically, she currently works developing future hydroclimatic scenarios for La Plata Basin.
Dr Ramiro SaurralDr Ramiro Saurral (Argentine)
University of Buenos Aires & CONICET

Ramiro Saurral holds a PhD from the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina). He works on climate variability focused on the Southern Hemisphere and has extensive experience on the study of the role played by climate on hydrology. He has also expertise in the assessment of the potential effects of climate change on climate and water management and availability over South America. Up to date, he has published more than 20 papers in peer-reviewed journals in the area and has established collaborations with different research groups at the University of Washington (USA), the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP, Italy) and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC, Spain).
Dr Rafael Santiago SeoaneDr Rafael Santiago Seoane (Argentine)
University of Buenos Aires

Rafael Santiago Seoane holds a PhD in Earth and Environmental Sciences from the University of La Coruña. Spain; an M.S. in Planning and Engineering of Hydraulic Resources from Simón Bolivar University, Venezuela; and a degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Buenos Aires (UBA) Argentina.
He has researched in the National Institute of Water Science and Technology (INA), and the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET). Presently he is a guest professor and researcher in the Center for Transdisciplinary Water Studies (CETA) in the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA). His research focusses on the application of statistical methods in the field of hydrology and hydroclimatology and the analysis of data from climate models and climate impact models.
Ana Belen Sanchez SchützeAna Belen Sanchez Schütze (Argentine)
University of Buenos Aires & CONICET

Ana Belen Sanchez Schütze is a PhD Student at the Center for Sea and Atmospheric Research (CIMA / CONICET-UBA-UMI-IFAECI). Her work deals with climate change in big cities of Argentina. Her research is mainly focused on the difference in precipitation between rural and urban areas and the potential effects of precipitation under different projections and emission scenarios.
Malena Sol Lozada MontanariMalena Sol Lozada Montanari (Argentine)
University of Buenos Aires & CONICET

Malena Sol Lozada Montanari is a PhD Student at the Center for Sea and Atmospheric Research (CIMA / CONICET-UBA-UMI-IFAECI). Her research topic focuses on assess the relationship between the consequences of climate change and the climate in big cities of Argentina, studying the potential effects on the temperatures of different projections and emission scenarios.